The Chicago Syndicate: Discounts
Showing posts with label Discounts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Discounts. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 03, 2019

Formal Warning from FBI on Hacked Smart TVs

Smart TVs are called that because they connect to the Internet. They allow you to use popular streaming services and apps. Many also have microphones for those of us who are too lazy to actually to pick up the remote. Just shout at your set that you want to change the channel or turn up the volume and you are good to go.

A number of the newer TV’s also have built-in cameras. In some cases, the cameras are used for facial recognition so the TV knows who is watching and can suggest programming appropriately. There are also devices coming to market that allow you to video chat with grandma in 42” glory.

Beyond the risk that your TV manufacturer and app developers may be listening and watching you, that television can also be a gateway for hackers to come into your home. A bad cyber actor may not be able to access your locked-down computer directly, but it is possible that your unsecured TV can give him or her an easy way in the backdoor through your router.

Hackers can also take control of your unsecured TV. At the low end of the risk spectrum, they can change channels, play with the volume, and show your kids inappropriate videos. In a worst-case scenario, they can turn on your bedroom TV's camera and microphone and silently cyberstalk you.

TVs and technology are a big part of our lives, and they aren’t going away. So how can you protect your family?

  • Know exactly what features your TV has and how to control those features. Do a basic Internet search with your model number and the words “microphone,” “camera,” and “privacy.”
  • Don’t depend on the default security settings. Change passwords if you can – and know how to turn off the microphones, cameras, and collection of personal information if possible. If you can’t turn them off, consider whether you are willing to take the risk of buying that model or using that service.
  • If you can’t turn off a camera but want to, a simple piece of black tape over the camera eye is a back-to-basics option.
  • Check the manufacturer’s ability to update your device with security patches. Can they do this? Have they done it in the past?
  • Check the privacy policy for the TV manufacturer and the streaming services you use. Confirm what data they collect, how they store that data, and what they do with it.

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office.

Monday, November 30, 2015

U.S. Marshals Offer Deals on #CyberMonday - Public encouraged to shop fed auctions; proceeds returned to crime victims

On “Cyber Monday,” U.S. Marshals continue to work for victims of crime by asking the public to consider placing a bid on unique items for sale in online auctions of forfeited assets that were seized during the course of two significant criminal investigations. Net proceeds will be returned to victims of the fraud-related crimes.

The first auction that closes on Dec. 1, includes assets seized from Rita Crundwell, the former comptroller of Dixon, Illinois, who in 2012 was convicted of stealing more than $53.7 million over two decades from the city where she was employed. She is serving a nearly 20-year federal prison sentence. More than 390 lots are being auctioned, to include 150 belt buckles.

The second online auction includes a wine collection of approximately 2,800 bottles seized from prominent wine dealer Rudy Kurniawan, who is serving a 10-year federal prison sentence following his conviction on fraud-related charges. The online auction of 537 lots closes on Dec. 8. Another online auction of approximately 1,900 bottles of wine will run from Dec. 1 - 15.

“Cyber Monday is generally thought to be the start of the online holiday shopping season,” said Jason Wojdylo, Chief Inspector of the U.S. Marshals Service Asset Forfeiture Division. “We would like to encourage shoppers who are already online in search of bargains to consider stopping by our auction website to bid on forfeited assets.”

“Make no mistake,” said Wojdylo.“these online auctions are designed to generate proceeds from ill-gotten gains to give back to victims.”

To access USMS online auctions, go to http://www.usmarshals.gov/assets/sales.htm.

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