Thursday, March 05, 2009

Pauline Pipitone Breaks Silence On The Senseless Murder Of Her Son During A Botched Mob Hit In 1986

It happened on Christmas Day, 1986. A mafia hit man shot and killed Nick Guido on a Brooklyn street. Except it was the wrong man. The address was supplied by two detectives on the mob payroll -- Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa.

On Friday they will be sentenced in federal court. But before then, the mother of Guido has broken her silence in an exclusive interview with CBS 2 HD.

"The door was open; the car door. He was just laying there. The blood just coming out the car," Pauline Pipitone said. "I touched his hand. I said, 'No, I want to touch him.' His fingers were cold.

Guido was showing his uncle his new car. The 26-year-old was a telephone installer, waiting to hear from the FDNY if he'd been accepted. When the killer walked up, Guido shoved his uncle down, and covered him with his own body.

"Nicholas got the whole, um, 10 bullets," Pipitone said.

Guido was killed on the orders of Anthony "Gas Pipe" Casso, then the underboss of the Lucchese crime family.

When asked if there is ever a day that goes by that she doesn't think about her son's death, Pipitone said, "No way. No way." She added that even though 22-plus years have gone by since the killing, "I cry every day and every night."

"I'm his mother. He was my whole life."

The killer was looking for another Nick Guido, but the mafia got the innocent man's address, the feds said, from two crooked New York City detectives at the time – Eppolito and Caracappa. Pipitone said she wants them to live long lives … behind bars.

"I want them to live a long time and know what I'm going through. That won't give me any peace, but still … I'll still be crying," Pipitone said.

A week after Guido was gunned down the letter came in the mail saying he had been accepted for training with the fire department.

When Eppolito and Caracappa are sentenced Friday, it will be for nine murders they either carried out or arranged for the mob.

Nick Guido was the only innocent man.

Thanks to Pablo Guzman

3 comments:

  1. To call Nicholas Guido the only "Innocent Man" the Mafia cops killed is a travesty. It is more correct to say that he is the only mistake. Since Israel Greenwald, the first victim of the rouge detectives, is not here to tell his story and some of the people involved in Israel Greenwald’s murder are still walking free and will likely never talk, it will be nearly impossible to learn the entire truth of the terrifying circumstances that led to Israel's murder. However one thing is for certain. Israel was NOT as some papers have called him a “mafia associate” nor had he ever met or had any dealings with Casso, Kaplan, Louis Eppolito or Stephen Carracapa. He was a good person who unwittingly fell into a bad situation. Israel tried to cooperate with the authorities, and was killed because of it. He was a true victim in every sense of the word. To say Guido was the only innocent victim implies that Israel was not. And who gives this writer the right to try and convict a dead man of any wrongdoings without absolute proof.

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  2. Thanks for sharing your comments on Israel Greenwald and bringing his story to light. Other readers can learn about him by doing a search at the top of the page. There you will find him described by most as "an unassuming diamond dealer."

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  3. It really is important to bring stories to light about people who cannot tell their own stories. The media's pens are as powerful as swords in swaying the public's opinion through subtle implications. For example, a recent article described Israel Greenwald as a jeweler whose dealings WITH Kaplan went sour. The people who know his true story including the facts brought out in court, know that Mr. Greenwald had no dealings at all with Kaplan, nor did he know of his existence. It is true that Mr. Greenwald was trying to cooperate with authorities and in the end corrupt agents of the law killed him. His story is very tragic and affected many people in a very direct and enduring way.

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